I cannot stress how important keeping an ideas notebook is. Even if an idea seems fairly insignificant at the time, note it down before you forget. That little idea could end up being the missing piece of a puzzle for a later project or creative problem.

You could keep your ideas in a notebook or go digital.

Physical Sketchbooks and Idea Notebooks

ideas notebook

I prefer using a hardback sketchbook so it’s something I want to keep and they don’t get too tatty. I like this method as allows me to both write and add sketches very loosely. You don’t have to create works of art, scribbles and notes are perfect. The drawings in my idea books are purely used to jog my memory or to allow me to start thinking through how something might look. I have a lot of these ideas notebooks from over the years and if I look back I know I will find ideas that I had totally forgotten about, that I might want to revisit at some point.

You might also want a method of recording ideas when you are out and about. I keep a notebook in my bag and in a drawer by my bed, just in case I get an idea in the middle of the night.

ideas notebook by bed

If you prefer to keep your ideas digitally there are a lot of options.

Storing Ideas Digitally

Google Docs

I have used Google Docs in the past when I challenged myself to come up with 3 ideas a day. This means you can access your notes from anywhere, mobile or desktop.

google docs for storing ideas

Your Phone’s Inbuilt Notes App or Voice Recorder

Most phones have a simple notes application or you could record a voice message.

Evernote

With Evernote, you can type directly into the app or email notes to your Evernote account. A good thing about Evernote is that it lets you tag your notes and is searchable. This makes ideas easier to find ideas later. Artist Susanna Reay who was on Episode 4 of the podcast uses Evernote to help store her ideas

Evernote for keeping ideas

Combine Analogue and Digital

If you want the best of both worlds try a method an entrepreneur told me about. He writes his ideas in physical notebooks. Then each week he takes photos of the pages and sends them to Evernote, tagging and dating them so they are easy to find.